Posts for: February, 2014

By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
February 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Orthodontist colorado springs COFor every profession, there are different educational steps to take. In healthcare, doctors spend many years learning and practicing in their areas of expertise. In Colorado Springs, Dr. Scott Suter has also taken the required educational and practical steps to provide top-notch orthodontic treatment. The path to becoming an orthodontist involves three steps: college, dental school and an accredited orthodontic residency program. Let’s take a glimpse at Dr. Suter’s educational checklist!
 

Dr. Suter’s orthodontic education

 
  • College: Colorado State University–Bachelor of Science degree
  • Dental School: University of Missouri–Kansas City
  • Accredited Orthodontic Program: St. Louis University
 
 

Dentist vs. orthodontist: where should you go?

If you have a malocclusion, the person you need to see is an orthodontist. While some dentist offices (general dentists) offer/promote orthodontic devices, such as Invisalign or ClearCorrect, they haven’t gone through the same courses and training as an orthodontist, who practices solely with orthodontic treatments that involve the use of metal braces, clear braces, palatal expanders, growth modification appliances, space maintainers, and invisible retainers.  Colorado Springs residents go to Suter Orthodontics for their beautiful smiles at an affordable price.
 
If you have any questions regarding your Colorado Springs orthodontist, patients can call (719) 550-0222. Also, check out Dr. Suter’s Facebook page for the latest in contests and give-a-ways!

By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
February 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   oral health  
HelpTeensMaintainGoodOralHealth

Kids do lots of changing in the teen years, as bodies and minds begin the process of becoming more “grown up.” By now, parental reminders to brush teeth and go easy on sugary snacks might be met with rolled eyes and a groan. But there are still several ways that parents can help their teens to maintain good oral health.

1) Make sure kids get — and wear — a professionally made, custom-fitted mouthguard when playing sports.

The American Dental Association says athletes are 60 times more likely to suffer dental injury if they don't wear a mouthguard. These devices also protect the jaw, lips, cheeks, and tongue — not just the teeth. A mouthguard that's custom-made from a model of your child's teeth costs a little more, but offers greater protection than an off-the-shelf model.

2) Talk to your teens about the dangers of oral piercings.

Like tattoos and iPods, piercings are probably a sign of the times. But that doesn't make them harmless. Installing tongue and lip bolts creates a risk for the teeth and soft tissues that are nearby. Tooth chipping, sensitivity and pain, along with gum recession and infection, are some of the issues that may accompany an oral piercing. Remind teens that future dental problems may be a high price to pay for a fleeting fashion statement.

3) Get professional help if you — or your teen — develop an addiction to tobacco, alcohol or drugs, or an eating disorder.

Nobody wants to admit they aren't in control. But peer pressure, body image concerns and a host of other issues may lead teens into dangerous behaviors. The negative effect of various addictions on one's general health is well-documented; with respect to oral health, there are particular concerns. Tobacco not only stains the teeth, but causes changes in the mouth that can lead to oral cancer. Erosion of the tooth enamel is both a diagnostic signal of a potential eating disorder, and a problem that needs treatment. Don't hesitate to ask questions, particularly when an examination reveals a potential problem, and be sure to seek professional help when needed.

If you would like more information about helping your teen maintain good oral health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”


By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
February 21, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
Tooth-HarmingHabitstoAvoid

Did you know that you probably do at least one thing during the course of an average day that puts your healthy smile at risk? These are some of the more common offenders:

Coffee, Soda, and Sports Drink Consumption
If you really can’t give them up, try to consume these beverages with restraint. Their high acidity and/or sugar content can erode protective tooth enamel, making your pearly whites more prone to staining and decay. Even natural fruit juices should be consumed in moderation as they tend to be high in sugar and sometimes acidity (e.g. orange juice). Your best bet? Water, of course. It won’t damage your teeth and thanks to fluoridation may even help remineralize and fortify your enamel.

Brushing Immediately After Eating
If you were told to brush after every meal, forget it. Acids in foods and beverages can soften your enamel, and brushing may actually accelerate erosion. Wait at least an hour to brush, which is the time it generally takes for your oral pH to normalize and your tooth enamel to reharden. However, it is advisable after eating to floss and rinse out your mouth with plain water or a mineralized dental wash to help wash away food particles.

Jaw Clenching, Tooth Grinding, Pencil Chewing
These and similar “parafunctional” behaviors — outside the uses for which teeth are designed — can cause undue tooth wear and exert stresses that can cause chips and fractures. They can affect other parts of the oral system, too, potentially resulting in jaw joint pain and muscle spasms, headaches and other head and neck ailments.

It’s hard to cut out all high-sugar/high-acid foods and beverages, so where complete elimination isn’t possible, focus on moderation and try to consume them only during mealtime. Jaw clenching and other parafunctional behaviors are often subconscious and may be harder to control; in such cases an unobtrusive device like a clear occlusal (bite) guard can alleviate the problem.

If you would like more information about tooth damage and prevention please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Decay” and “Stress & Tooth Habits.”


By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
February 13, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: x-rays   oral health  
RadiationExposurefromDentalX-RayImagingIsntaCauseforConcern

Your dental care would be much more limited without our ability to see “below the surface” with x-ray imaging. But since x-rays passing through the body are a form of radiation, could your exposure from them be hazardous to your health?

It depends on exposure dosages and, of course, the amount you have been exposed to over your lifetime. But, decades of research have demonstrated that exposure to dental x-rays during your regular office visits are only a fraction of the radiation you normally encounter from the natural environment every year.

X-rays have the ability to pass through body tissues, but at different rates for soft tissue like skin and muscle and hard tissue like bone. This effect creates shadows on exposed film; the differentiation is in such detail that a trained technician can interpret not only internal structures, but defects such as fractured bone or, in the case of dentistry, signs of tooth decay and bone loss from gum disease.

But like other energy sources in our environment, x-rays do emit radiation that in high doses can be dangerous to living tissue. The amount of exposure is measured in millisieverts (mSv), a unit that allows for comparison of doses from different sources of radiation. Scientists have calculated that we’re normally exposed to between 2 and 4.5 mSv every year.

By contrast, a single digital periapical image taken of a tooth is equal to 1 microsievert (μSv), or one thousandth of an mSv; a full mouth series (between 18 and 20 images) creates an exposure of 85 μSv, or 85/1000 of one mSv. In addition, advances in technology have further reduced the radiation exposure from x-ray imaging. For example, digital imaging has reduced exposure during full mouth x-rays from seven to ten days of equal exposure from normal background radiation to half a day, and with no loss in image quality.

In effect, dental x-rays pose little to no risk for patients. Still, understanding that x-ray imaging does expose patients to radiation, dentists follow certain protocols and safety precautions. For example, dentists will place a lead apron around their patients’ chest area during an x-ray exposure.

As your dentist, we’re happy to address any concerns you may have about x-ray radiation exposure. But rest assured, the x-ray devices used in your dental care, so necessary in the fight against tooth decay and other diseases, are safe and reliable.

If you would like more information on the use of x-ray technology and safety, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “X-Ray Frequency and Safety.”


By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
February 05, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TVsNateBerkusDiscussesDentalSealantsFluorideTreatmentsandFlossing

Nate Berkus, author, interior designer and host of his own television program, The Nate Berkus Show, is a consummate professional who has always focused on “helping others love the way they live,” as he puts it. Berkus is known as one of America's most beloved go-to-guys for inspiration on the latest design trends. And then there is his captivating smile.

In an exclusive interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Berkus discusses his trademark smile. Unlike most people in Hollywood, his smile is totally natural — he never wore braces or had any cosmetic work. However, Berkus does give credit to his childhood dentist for the preventative healthcare he received as a young boy. Berkus states, “I'm grateful for having been given fluoride treatments and sealants as a child. Healthy habits should start at a young age.”

As for his oral hygiene routine today, Berkus says he brushes his teeth at least two times a day, and sometimes three times a day. Berkus is also an avid “flosser” and follows the important flossing advice he learned from his dentist: “Floss the ones you want to keep.”

In addition to his design expertise, Berkus is right on the mark with his opinions on oral hygiene. In fact, he inspired our office to put together the following list of facts and oral health tips:

  • The first step in improving your oral health is to learn good oral hygiene behavior. Simply put, to maintain optimal oral health, you must brush and floss properly so that you thoroughly remove the dental plaque.
  • The second step is a thorough evaluation system. We are a key part of this step. During your next office visit, we can conduct a thorough examination, review your brushing and flossing techniques, examine the health of your tongue and discuss any questions you have. We can also clean your teeth and ensure that you leave our offices confident with your new oral hygiene routine. And if you don't have an appointment, contact us today to schedule one.

To learn more about improving your oral hygiene, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Hygiene Behavior - Dental Health For Life.” And to read the entire interview with Nate Berkus, please see the article “Nate Berkus.”