Posts for tag: clear orthodontic aligners

By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
April 27, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
ProvidingAClearAlternativeToTraditionalOrthodonticBraces

Years ago, if you hadn't received braces by the time you finished high school odds are you would never pursue orthodontic treatment. Most adults wouldn't have even dreamed of wearing braces! Thankfully, today, clear aligners have quickly become a popular alternative for adults who have mild to moderate crowding or spacing of teeth.

Unlike traditional orthodontic “braces” in which small (metal) brackets are attached to the teeth, clear aligners use a sequence of individual, clear, removable “trays” to straighten teeth. These trays completely cover each tooth and gradually move the teeth into new improved positions. Clear aligners can be used to realign mildly crowded or tipped teeth, to close small spaces between teeth and even treat elongated teeth.

Your clear aligners will be computer-generated based on current dental records. If you would like to find out if you are a candidate for orthodontic treatment using clear aligners, we will need a full set of records to properly assess your case starting with a thorough examination, taking radiographs (x-rays) of your teeth, jaws and skull, as well as photos and impressions of your teeth that can be used to create models. If you have a good bite, which means that your back teeth fit together properly, clear aligners should be a viable treatment option for you. However, if your upper and lower jaws don't align properly, resulting in a severe overbite or underbite, you will more likely need traditional orthodontic braces to straighten your teeth and improve your bite.

Each patient presents unique dental challenges. Cases vary, but you can expect to have to wear the aligners all day except when eating, for an average of anywhere from six months to two years. But don't worry about what others might think — clear aligners are barely noticeable at all.

If you are ready to improve your smile with this state-of-the-art orthodontic treatment, call our office today. To read more about clear orthodontic aligners, and to view photos that compare traditional orthodontics to clear alternatives, please read the article “Clear Orthodontic Aligners: An Alternative For Adult Orthodontics” in Dear Doctor magazine.

By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
April 20, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
DoClearOrthodonticAlignersReallyWork

Compared to traditional braces, orthodontic clear aligners seem miraculous in many ways, almost too good to be true. You may be wondering if they really work. The answer is yes — but they are not for everyone.

What are orthodontic aligners and how do they work?

Clear orthodontic aligners are an alternative to traditional braces that are used to move your teeth and transform your smile without much interference to your daily life. They are removable trays made of a clear plastic material that is essentially invisible.

When using aligners, a sequence of slightly different trays is custom-made to fit over your teeth. You must wear each one 20 hours a day for two weeks before changing to the next in the series. The aligners are computer generated, designed by state-of-the-art techniques based on models and images of your own teeth. They work because slight changes in the sequential aligners gradually shift your teeth. If they are worn consistently, the process takes from six months to two or three years.

Advantages over traditional braces are:

  • The aligners can be removed for eating, drinking, brushing, flossing and social occasions.
  • They have no rough edges or wires, making them more comfortable.
  • Changes become visible quickly as your teeth move into their new, better positions.

Clear aligners are a good solution for correcting mild to moderately crowded or incorrectly spaced teeth. They are most effective if your back teeth already fit together properly. Clear aligners are usually effective in correcting simpler or tipping movements of teeth in two dimensions. For more complex movements, traditional braces may be required. Clear aligners are usually recommended for adults whose teeth and jaws are fully developed, and not for children.

When do you need traditional fixed braces?

Traditional braces are fixed brackets attached to the teeth through which narrow, flexible wires are threaded. They may be necessary if your teeth do not meet properly, creating too much overbite or underbite. Closing spaces where teeth are missing, rotating teeth, or other complicated situations probably make you a better candidate for traditional braces.

Each particular situation is unique. To find out if clear aligners are right for you, make an appointment with us for an assessment and diagnosis of your own situation. For more information see the Dear Doctor magazine article “Clear Orthodontic Aligners.”

By Orthodontics for Children and Adults
December 29, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
6FAQsAboutOrthodontics

Maybe you had braces as a child, or you are thinking of having your own (it's never too late) or your child's teeth straightened through orthodontia. But how much do you really know about this branch of dentistry? Here are six questions people often ask about orthodontia.

Q. How did the word “orthodontia” originate?
A. From Latin roots meaning “straight” and “teeth”

Q. Teeth are anchored in bone. How is it possible to move them?
A. Living bone is not unchanging. The bone, ligament, and the outer layer of a tooth's root (called cementum) react to the stresses of biting and chewing. Due to this stimulation the bone is constantly being resorbed (broken down) and rebuilt as it is pushed from one side of a tooth and pulled from the other. Under normal conditions, there is a balance resulting in a steady state. Orthodontia takes advantage of this process to slowly change the teeth's position in the desired way.

Q. My dentist talks about the periodontal ligament. What does this mean?
A. The ligament is a fibrous tissue that connects the teeth to their bone and takes part in the dynamic process of resorption and rebuilding of the bone.

Q. What kinds of conditions can orthodontia correct?
A. Treatment can improve the teeth's position and relations to each other (being too crowded or badly spaced) and the way the upper and lower jaws relate. It can enhance the appearance of a person's teeth and face, and can also improve the teeth's function in biting and chewing.

Q. What is the best first step to orthodontic treatment?
A. Talk to your general dentist about your concerns. If you are referred to an orthodontist, the next step is to assess your situation using molds of your teeth that show the way the upper and lower teeth meet (your bite). Special x-rays will be taken to show the locations of your teeth and relation of your upper and lower jaw. Your dental team may also use photographs of your smile and computer imaging to get a clear view of how your teeth are now and how they may be moved.

Q. What are some of the methods of treatment?
A. In the traditional method, small metal brackets are attached to the crowns of the teeth. Thin wires, called arch wires, are strung through attachments on the brackets. These wires are used to apply controlled force to direct the teeth in the desired direction. Another method is to use removable clear plastic aligners. A series of aligners is designed by a computer, to be changed from one to the next as the positions of the teeth slowly change.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about braces and orthodontia. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Moving Teeth with Orthodontics” and “The Magic of Orthodontics.”